Overland Art Program Curator, Tamra Collins, recently sat with Jesse Amado to discuss nature, society and sparking a rich dialogue with art.

To listen to Jesse’s interview in full, press the “►” at the top of the blog post.

Known for art that is conceptually based and highly formal, Jesse Amado was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas, he received his BA in English from the University of Texas at Austin and his BFA and MFA from the University of Texas at San Antonio. Amado resided in both Texas and New York City for many years but has now chosen to live in his hometown full time.

Utilizing forms, images, felt materials and fashions, he produces commentaries on the ambiguous nature of contemporary culture. Jesse Amado’s art can be found in various private and public collections throughout Texas, the United States and internationally, including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Washington D.C.; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; Dallas Museum of Art, TX; Blanton Museum, Austin, TX; San Antonio Museum of Art, TX; and Linda Pace Foundation, San Antonio, TX.

"We all know now that there’s a big, big problem in this country with overdoses and addiction to all these wonderful drugs that pharma thinks we should be taking. That’s all part of the conversation. That’s all part of the dialogue. I hope to achieve having the works up there like that, being formal, and as beautiful as they are. Then once you’re that close, once the seduction has happened, then the dialogue I hope will also emerge…"
— Jesse Amado

"I’m just really providing a visual placebo, let’s say, and I hope that’s a better alternative than chemicals. I guess that’s my modest proposal anyway. That’s my concede and I’m going with it."
— Jesse Amado
Jesse Amado addresses attendees at the Ruiz-Healy Artist Reception

Jesse Amado addresses attendees at the Ruiz-Healy Artist Reception

"Now I’m using the circle, and that’s a geometric shape that you can find in nature. Look at the sun, look at the moon, and really that’s the purest geometric shape that you can find in nature. You can’t find a rectangle, you can’t find a perfect triangle, perfect square, etcetera. I am working with a circle now, and that’s really interesting to me … the metaphorical aspect of it – coming full circle and going around…"
— Jesse Amado

For more about Jesse Amado, visit the Ruiz-Healy gallery website.

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